Investors Brace for Big Moves in Wake of Greek Vote

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As votes were being counted after the close of the Greek referendum Sunday, investors in European stocks and bonds were gearing up for some big market moves, whatever the outcome.

China's Hunger for Robots Marks Significant Shift

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Having devoured many of the world’s factory jobs, China is now handing them over to robots. The country’s emergence as an automation hub contradicts many assumptions about robots and the global economy.

Aetna and Humana: Justifying the Prize

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Aetna will have to work hard on costs to make its $37 billion Humana deal add up.

Samsung Still Has Galaxies to Explore

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Investors staring at Samsung’s slow progress bar should stay patient.

Get Ready to Weather the Price of El Niño

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The return of the El Niño weather phenomenon is forcing agricultural commodity players to prepare for low crop yields and heightened price volatility.

Malaysian Prime Minister Faces Political Test

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Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib Razak faces a political test after allegedly being linked to problems ensnaring a debt-laden state investment fund.

Oil Pipeline Inspection Tools: Far From Perfect

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Oil pipeline companies like to brag that their advanced testing methods and remote monitoring technology prevent spills. So why was a southern California beach coated in crude?

China's Central Bank to Provide Liquidity to Help Stabilize Stocks

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China’s central bank will provide liquidity to help stabilize the country’s crumbling stock market.

Greek Importers Begin to Feel the Squeeze

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Capital controls in Greece don’t appear yet to have significantly curbed the country’s imports, especially of essential items. But for nonessential goods, Greek importers are starting to feel the squeeze.

Greek, German Tensions Turn to Resentment

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Whatever the outcome of Greece’s bailout referendum, tensions between Greeks and Germans over the debt crisis have now erupted into open displays of frustration and resentment that won't die down quickly.

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