Will Advertising Dollars Return to TV?

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The TV advertising market suffered a brutal spring and summer, as national marketers reduced their spending. Now, as the new fall season nears, media executives are betting that ad dollars will return. Ad executives aren't so sure.

Family-Film Overload? Hollywood Ramps Up Animated Releases

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Family-film overload? Between September and December, four animated movies will be released by Hollywood's major studios.

Health Insurers Brace for Round Two

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On Nov. 15, the health-law marketplaces will reopen for business, selling coverage to millions of Americans. Health insurers are hoping the process will be much smoother this time around.

U.S. Manufacturing Rolls on Aged Wheels

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Even as economic indicators rise, domestic capital spending has remained anemic by historical standards and the nation's capital equipment base is getting long in the tooth.

Kohl's Partners With DreamWorks Unit to Market to Teens

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Kohl's Corp., hoping to reinvigorate its sluggish sales, is turning for help to AwesomenessTV, a YouTube video network well established with teenagers.

CVS Changes Name as It Ends Tobacco Sales

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CVS Caremark emerged from its seven-month purge of tobacco products with a new corporate name: CVS Health.

Netflix in Licensing Pact for 'Gotham'

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Netflix Inc. has struck a deal with Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. to secure streaming rights in all its territories for 'Gotham.'

China Securitization Stirs Worry

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China's securitization market is booming, as Beijing relaxes rules to help funding for companies and ease the strains on banks, triggering worries the surge could add risks to the financial system.

Wet Seal CEO Leaves Company

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Wet Seal Inc. disclosed Tuesday that its chief executive left the company, effective Aug. 26, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Banks' Fee Bonanza Dries Up

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Banks are making less of their money from customer-account fees than at any time in the past seven decades as strict government rules and changing consumer behavior squeeze a major source of revenue.

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