Deutsche Bank to Buy Back $5.4 Billion in Debt

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Deutsche Bank said it will buy back $5.4 billion of its senior unsecured debt, in a move designed to bolster investor confidence in the German lender’s liquidity and in the value of its securities.

U.S. Retail Sales Rose 0.2% in January

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American consumers increased their spending in January, a robust start to the year amid low unemployment and months of cheap gasoline.

U.S. Import Prices Fell 1.1% in January

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Prices for imported goods fell sharply in January, the latest sign that a slumping global economy and plunging oil prices are weighing on inflation in the U.S.

Eurozone: Why Steady Growth Is a Tougher Task

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The eurozone economy made progress last year. But growth was modest despite a multitude of tailwinds that have now lessened.

New Lender Worry: Oil Firms Max Out Credit Lines

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Struggling oil and gas companies are maxing out revolving credit lines typically used to cover short-term funding gaps, raising fresh concerns about banks’ exposure to the decline in energy prices.

Oil Glut: What Storage Signals Mean for Prices

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A gusher of oil at Cushing, the delivery point for the U.S. benchmark crude-futures contract, has put extreme pressure on prices this week.

Facebook Moves to Find, Block Terrorist Content

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Facebook, under pressure from government officials, is more aggressively policing material it views as supporting terrorism.

Market Meltdown Threatens Japan's Economic Revival

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Global market turmoil has upended Japan’s finely tuned plan for recovery, sending the country’s top economic advisers scrambling for ways to cope.

The Big Beneficiary of Negative Rates: Gold

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Investors are piling into gold, seeking shelter amid concerns that a turn toward negative interest rates in some countries is threatening to destabilize the global financial system.

This Japanese Bank Doesn't Deserve So Much Negativity

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Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, Japan’s biggest bank, has a big enough cushion to survive market shocks.

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