Companies' Report on Brazil Dam Failure Adds Little New on Causes

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The companies responsible for the failure of a massive tailings dam in Brazil reported the causes of the incident. But it added little information to what Brazilian police and prosecutors had gathered.

At Ports, a Sign of How Retailers Are Adjusting Supply Chains

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Economists say subdued activity at U.S. ports is a sign of how retailers are slimming down their supply chains as more of their customers shop online.

Apple Faces $14.5 Billion Bill Over Illegal Tax Breaks

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The European Union demanded that Ireland recoup roughly $14.5 billion in taxes from Apple, a move that could intensify a feud between the EU and the U.S. over the bloc’s tax probes into American companies.

'Soft Skills' Like Critical Thinking Are in Short Supply

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Companies across the U.S. say it is becoming increasingly tough to find job applicants who have ‘soft skills’ like the ability to communicate clearly, take initiative, problem-solve and get along with co-workers.

Hanjin Shipping Moves Closer to Bankruptcy

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Hanjin Shipping’s creditors said they would no longer give the South Korean company financial support, pushing it close to bankruptcy.

What Happens When a Central Bank Buys Property Stocks

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The Bank of Japan’s asset purchases have helped shares in real-estate investment trusts, but home builder stocks may be telling the true story.

Alphabet Executive Leaves Uber Board

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Uber Technologies Inc. on Monday said longtime Alphabet Inc. David Drummond executive has left its board amid increasing competition between the two tech companies over self-driving cars.

Why China Hasn't Cut Rates in What Feels Like Forever

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Growth isn’t budging and economic data continues to underwhelm. But China hasn’t eased monetary policy in over six months. Or so it seems.

Fed's Dislike of Negative Interest Rates Points to Limits of Stimulus

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Fed officials don’t think negative rates are needed in the U.S. because the economy and job market are improving and they are hoping they will never have to use them in the future given their uncertainty about whether the policy works.

Why Lighter Shelves Won't Support Sagging Retailers for Long

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Retail inventories are the healthiest they have been in a long time, but investors shouldn’t expect the discipline to last very long.

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