NFL Sponsors Speak Out---but Keep on Advertising

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As controversy swirls around the NFL, brands are facing a difficult task: how to make a strong statement against wrongdoing like domestic violence without jeopardizing lucrative deals with the league.

Japanese Game Makers Enlist Google

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The Japanese makers of such local hits as "Monster Strike" and "White Cat Project" are turning to an alliance with Google to help them cultivate new audiences outside the island nation.

Canadian National Railway Faces Fine

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Canadian National Railroad faces a fine for failing to meet government-mandated grain-shipment levels meant to ease a bottleneck in Western Canada.

Daimler Sees Sales of More Than €120 Billion in 2014

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The German auto maker has specified its forecasts for the year, projecting sales of more than 2.4 million vehicles amounting to more than €120 billion.

Toshiba Restructures PC Business

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Toshiba said it would accelerate the restructuring of its PC business to focus on the business-to-business field and would withdraw from certain consumer markets.

Lenders Turning to High-Interest Personal Loans

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In a bid to boost revenues squeezed by new regulations, lenders are turning to high-interest personal loans, a market in which they face stiff competition from upstart rivals.

Bass Pro Shops Considers Financing Alternatives

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Bass Pro Shops, a retailer of fishing, hunting and other outdoor-recreation gear, is considering alternatives for raising funds, according to people familiar with the matter.

Discovery to Take Control of Hub Children's Network

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Discovery Communications and toy maker Hasbro are ending their joint partnership in the Hub, a cable network that hoped to become a force in children's television.

Bayer to Seek Plastics IPO

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Bayer plans to seek an initial public offering of stock for its plastics business and focus on the company's more profitable life-sciences operations.

Robots Work Their Way Into Small Factories

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New, relatively inexpensive collaborative robots—designed to work alongside people in close settings—are changing how some smaller U.S. manufacturers do their jobs.

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