Activist Investors Make Peace With AIG

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Billionaire investors Carl Icahn and John Paulson dropped their public fight with American International Group Inc. on Thursday, promising a year of peace in exchange for two board seats.

Loan Valuations Draw Scrutiny

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Publicly traded finance companies are coming under scrutiny for how they value obscure assets tied to business loans, at a time when market turbulence is motivating some firms to mark down securities faster than others.

Bank Stocks Sink Further, but Dimon Is Buyer

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J.P. Morgan Chase’s chairman and CEO bought 500,000 of his firm’s shares, trying to deliver a jolt of confidence to investors as a monthlong slide in bank stocks threatened to become an avalanche.

New Lender Worry: Oil Firms Max Out Credit Lines

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Struggling oil and gas companies are maxing out revolving credit lines typically used to cover short-term funding gaps, raising fresh concerns about banks’ exposure to the decline in energy prices.

Why the Yen Just Keeps Getting Stronger

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The ferocious strengthening of the yen reveals the brittle underpinnings of the Abenomics stock-market rally.

The Big Beneficiary of Negative Rates: Gold

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Investors are piling into gold, seeking shelter amid concerns that a turn toward negative interest rates in some countries is threatening to destabilize the global financial system.

Credit Barometer Flashes a Warning Sign on Banks

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The cost of insurance against default on the debt of many big banks has jumped, adding to the forces pummeling confidence in markets.

Why Low Interest Rates Aren't Low Enough to Save Stocks

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Weak growth, low inflation and rising borrowing costs are putting the squeeze on companies.

Fed's Inflation Woes Have a Foreign Accent

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Friday’s report on import prices is expected to put additional pressure on inflation, further complicating the Fed’s plans.

Morgan Stanley to Pay $3.2 Billion to End Government Mortgage Probes

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Morgan Stanley will pay $3.2 billion to resolve government charges that it misled investors about the quality of mortgage bonds it ahead of the 2008 financial crisis.

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