Are There Bargains Among the 'Brexit' Wreckage?

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Not all stocks were equally hit when the U.K. voted to leave the European Union, but that doesn’t necessarily mean a buying opportunity.

'Independence Day' Sequel Fails to Catch Fire

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Hollywood’s big bet on sequels this summer continued to pay off poorly as ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’ fizzled, with ticket sales of about $41.6 million in the U.S. and Canada on its opening weekend.

Americans Sleeping More, Working Less, Survey Finds

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Americans overall are working less and sleeping more than they did a decade ago, due to an aging population and fewer people in the workforce. But those who have a job are spending more time on the clock

Raw Economic Data Is Just Noise That Needs to Be Silenced

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Seasonal effects drown out the actual trends. Columnist Jo Craven McGinty explains how adjusted numbers make comparisons between months, years or even economic sectors meaningful.

Brexit Collateral Damage Puts Japan in Hot Seat

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With “Brexit” sending the yen to its strongest level in years, the Bank of Japan will need to prepare a response.

Why 'Brexit' Will Raise Trade Barriers

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Britain’s new trade bargain with the European Union won’t be settled for years, but investors shouldn’t bank on a maintenance of the status quo.

Hilsenrath's Take: 'Brexit' Vote Means More Fed Delay

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Market mayhem and the strengthening U.S. dollar following Britain’s decision to leave the European Union make it increasingly likely the Federal Reserve will delay plans to raise short-term interest rates, WSJ’s Jon Hilsenrath writes.

'Brexit' Expected to Rattle U.S. Economy, Shake Its Influence

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Britain’s exit from the European Union is expected to jolt the U.S. economy, likely rattling restive equity markets and driving up the value of the dollar. It could also weaken U.S. diplomatic leverage in Europe and upend the corporate strategies of U.S. companies based in London.

Brexit: This Is Not a Drill -- Banks Get a Real-Life Stress Test

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If there wasn’t so much pain involved, investors in the biggest U.S. banks might enjoy the irony: little more than six hours after the U.S. Federal Reserve released its first round of bank ‘stress test’ results, financial firms and markets get a real-world version.

U.S. Businesses Continue Pullback on New-Equipment Purchases

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American businesses were pulling back on purchases of new equipment even before the U.K. vote to exit the European Union rocked global financial markets, a sign of corporate caution that will likely continue to act as a brake on the economy.

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