Copper, Aluminum Fall to Six-Year Lows

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Copper and aluminum prices have sunk to their lowest levels in six years, as industrial metals took a fresh hit from China’s slowing economy.

Spy Software Gets a Second Life on Wall Street

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A wave of companies with ties to the intelligence community is winning over the world of finance.

Sears to Report First Profit Since 2012

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Sears Holdings said Monday that a gain from the spinoff of some of its real estate will likely drive its first profit in three years, though the retailer said sales continued to slide in its second quarter.

Imports of Digital Goods Face Test

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Law Journal: The clash over protecting a free-flowing Internet while also fighting online piracy has shifted to an unlikely and largely unknown setting: a legal battle about teeth-alignment devices at a federal trade body.

Aid's Role in Rising Tuition Gains Credence

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More economists believe the federal government’s loose standards for student loans are fueling a vicious cycle of higher college tuition prices, similar to what some say happened with the housing bubble.

Eurozone Crisis Nations Leave Greece Behind

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The eurozone recovery is increasingly being led by those hardest hit by the crisis – except for Greece.

Middle East Refinery Expansion Plans Hit Snags

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Middle Eastern countries are experiencing setbacks in plans to expand their oil-refining capacity, dealing a blow to efforts to address an expensive irony: petroleum-rich nations importing products such as gasoline.

Companies Sour on Delaware as Corporate Haven

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The most popular state for corporate registrations now has challengers who say it doesn’t offer enough protections against shareholder lawsuits.

Noble Group's Troubles Aren't Going Away

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Commodities trader Noble Group needs to stanch the bleeding. It better hope someone comes quickly.

China Proposes to Keep Online Payments in Check

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Draft rules for online payments issued by China’s central bank look set to hamper the growth of services offered by the likes of Alibaba’s financial affiliate and Tencent.

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