Global Economy Week Ahead: Chinese Manufacturing, ECB Meeting, U.S. Jobs

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Though shortened by holidays in the U.S. and U.K., this week will help set the stage for whether the global economy is heading into a summer of strength or doldrums, with Chinese manufacturing data, a European Central Bank meeting and the U.S. jobs report on the schedule.

Janet Yellen Sees Rate Hike Coming Soon

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Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen on Friday signaled the central bank will likely raise interest rates within months if the U.S. economy keeps gaining strength.

U.S. First-Quarter GDP Growth Revised Higher to 0.8%

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The U.S. economy’s first-quarter slowdown was less pronounced than initially thought, and recent data have pointed to a pickup for growth this spring.

The Economy vs. Earnings: Companies Aren't Winning

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The U.S. economy isn’t as weak as the GDP report suggests. As that becomes clear, companies will need to find another excuse.

Williams and Energy Transfer: No Rhyme or Reason

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Energy Transfer Equity’s counterclaims in a suit against Williams Cos are hard to swallow.

Terex-Zoomlion: Another Chinese Deal Bites the Dust

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After Zoomlion abruptly pulled the plug on buying U.S. equipment maker Terex, other potential takeover targets might want to grill their Chinese suitors on whether they have the cash, or are truly willing to pay the price.

Oil Prices Poised to Hit Sweet Spot

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On Thursday oil prices rose above $50 a barrel, putting crude back within a range between $50 and $60 in which almost everybody benefits, economists and investors say.

U.S. Consumer Sentiment at Highest Level in 11 Months

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Americans are more confident than at any time in almost a year—with the consumer sentiment index rising to 94.7 this month from April’s 89.0—as cheap gasoline, low interest rates, and a rebound in stocks boost the economy’s prospects.

Markets' Mixed Signals: No All-Clear for Investors Yet

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Risk appetite has recovered since the panic at the start of the year. Or has it?

U.S. Companies Dial Back Their Investment

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Slower spending on capital goods comes despite a solid labor market, a strengthening housing sector and continuing low interest rates.

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