Fitbit's Challenge: Become a 'Need-to-Have'

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As growth slows and the novelty of wearable fitness gadgets fades for many customers, the company is trying to position its products as health tools that measure long-term conditions.

Huawei's Hard-Charging Workplace Culture Drives Growth, Demands Sacrifice

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Founder Ren Zhengfei’s intense style looms large at world’s No. 3 smartphone maker, where employees are rewarded for things like forgoing vacations and overtime.

Jobless Rate Hits Lowest Level Since Before Recession

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U.S. employers hired at a steady clip in November while the unemployment rate fell to 4.6%, the lowest level in nine years—signs of enduring labor-market growth that will likely leave Fed officials on track to raise rates this month.

Airbnb Won't Pursue Legal Case Against New York Over Rental Law

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Airbnb Inc. agreed to drop a lawsuit against New York City over recently enacted legislation that will fine hosts there for listing many common short-term rentals.

Inventory Check: We Went to the Stores

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Heard on the Street is conducting an experiment to see how retailers’ claim that low inventory will mean less discounting is playing out.

Global Bond Markets: Into the Maelstrom

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The storm that battered bond markets in November doesn’t seem likely to abate just yet.

Chips Need a Nick, Not a Cut

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Semiconductor stocks are vulnerable after big run-up, but strong fundamentals remain.

Little Slack But Not Much Heat in Labor Market

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Unemployment hits nine-year low but modest wage growth shows there is still some slack in labor market.

U.S. Health Spending Rose Faster Than Expected in 2015

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U.S. health spending grew faster than expected in 2015 as consumers recovered from the economic downturn and the Affordable Care Act’s coverage provisions took hold, according to federal statistics released Friday.

Tax Rules on Corporate Inversions Face Uncertain Future

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The Treasury Department spent nearly three years reshaping international corporate transactions and deterring inversions. Now, all that work, capped with a crucial set of final rules in October, could come undone.

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