Who's Listening

The people have spoken, and Larry Kudlow is wondering who is listening.
Sen. Scott Brown’s epic victory in Massachusetts on Tuesday night dealt a crushing blow to Obamacare, cap-and-trade, card check (and other union favors), and most importantly, all the tax hikes that are lingering on the table. But does Washington really understand the Scott Brown message?
Democrats were certainly given a slap upside the head by voters, but it's important to note that this was not a party line vote - there is an anti-incumbent attitude resulting from the way Washington, and Beacon Hill, do business, and politicians from both sides need to listen up.
And that leads to the next question. Are the Republicans listening? Do they really understand why Scott Brown was victorious? If they do, why aren’t members of the Republican leadership loudly campaigning for an end to tax hikes, just like Scott Brown?
Posing is not allowed - the people are looking for action.
Remember that Brown ran on a JFK/Ronald Reagan platform of across-the-board tax cuts to promote economic growth. Take a look at what the senator-elect had to say during his victory speech Tuesday night: This [health care] bill is not being debated openly and fairly. It will raise taxes, it will hurt Medicare, it will destroy jobs and run our nation deeper into debt . . . I will work in the Senate to put the government back on the side of people who create jobs and the millions of people who need jobs. And remember, as President John F. Kennedy stated, that starts with across-the-board tax cuts for businesses and families to create jobs, put more money in people’s pockets, and stimulate the economy. It’s that simple.
Obama says he was too busy to let Americans know that he feels our pain - which means we're going to be getting a new, more emotive, Obama this year. Can we get a new Republican party?
For example, some Blue Dog Democrats want to extend the Bush tax cuts, rather than letting them expire next year. Republican leaders should be making a big deal about this. They need to get it front and center, making expiration a condition to any new legislation.
In the Bush years, the GOP was part of the big government problem. Big government is the enemy. Here's Charles Krauthammer today.
An astonishing 56 percent of Massachusetts voters, according to a Rasmussen poll, called health care their top issue. In a Fabrizio, McLaughlin & Associates poll, 78 percent of Brown voters said their vote was intended to stop Obamacare. Only a quarter of all voters in the Rasmussen poll cited the economy as their top issue, nicely refuting the Democratic view that Massachusetts was just the usual anti-incumbent resentment you expect in bad economic times.
The gift of Obama should be that Americans come to understand that Democrats = liberal = big government. The GOP must stand firmly in the small government corner, in the Scott Brown Republican corner, to make sure voters don't get confused when they're taking aim.