With Us

The nation is with us in rooting for a Scott Brown victory and an end to the deliberate slide into socialism.
Like fans cheering for their favorite football teams, voters nationwide are paying attention to the special U.S. Senate race in Massachusetts. Almost half of them are rooting for Republican candidate Scott Brown over his Democratic opponent, Martha Coakley.
Turnout is high in the state today, but the lines tend to be in the parking lots, where light snow today, and yesterday's snowfall, make getting in and out slow with spaces less plentiful. But lines inside seem not to be bad, a result, I suspect, of having only one vote to make - in my case, a single circle filled in with a number two pencil for Scott Brown.
A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 49% of likely voters nationwide want Brown to win, while 34% are cheering on Coakley. Seventeen percent (17%) are undecided.
There are no ominous ripples to be seen in the hoped for scenario - a comfortable with for Mr. Brown - as all the polls, all of the analysts, and all the the signals from Democrats point toward a Martha Coakley loss. The apparently high turnout would seem to reduce the pollsters margins of error - the hard part in calling the race was knowing whether the balanced sample in the polls would match who showed up to vote, a challenge that would appear to diminish as turnout increases.
Given Massachusetts’ status as one of the most Democratic states in the country, it’s perhaps no surprise that the gap is somewhat narrower when voters are asked who they think will actually win the race. Forty-four percent (44%) predict Brown will be the winner, 35% say Coakley. Twenty-one percent (21%) aren’t sure.
The tip of the spear motivating voters to put an end to hope and change is health reform.
Just 38% of voters nationwide favor the health care reform plan proposed by President Obama and congressional Democrats. That matches the lowest level of support yet. Fifty-six percent (56%) of voters oppose the plan. As has been the case throughout the debate, those who feel strongly about the issue are more likely to be opposed. Just 18% of voters Strongly Favor the plan while 44% are Strongly Opposed.
The Washington Post thought it worth mentioning that Scott drove himself to vote, surprised, I would guess, at his self-sufficiency instead of being whisked by a driver in a big black SUV like a John Kerry wannabe.
The state senator drove himself to the polls Tuesday in the green pickup truck that came to symbolize his workmanlike campaign. The odometer read over 201,000 miles.
This is part of Scott's appeal. It will take him some time to adjust to having a driver if he chooses to do so.