Teddy's Ghost

America is under attack. Team Obama, determined to pass his health system reform measure without regard for the opposition within his own party - and the contempt of the American people toward that proposal - is hoping to get his ship back on course with Teddy's Ghost at the helm.
Senior Democrats in Washington and Massachusetts have thrown their support behind a proposal to appoint a temporary replacement to fill the seat of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), whose death Tuesday left the leading cause of his political life -- national health insurance -- with one fewer vote of support.
First step for the Bad Government Crowd? Get a new Kennedy into the vacant Massachusetts Senate seat.
Obama apparently sees the power of the Kennedys as the last trick available to save the health reform scam. To make the weather perfect in Obama's Camelot, the law in Massachusetts must be changed so that the Governor has the power to appoint an interim successor.
In his last public action, Kennedy sent a letter last week to Patrick asking that state law be changed so the governor could name a successor to hold the job until the special election. Democrats initially seemed cool to the proposal, and Republicans complained that it smacked of hypocrisy, given that the appointment power was taken away in 2004 when the GOP held the governor's office and Kerry was battling for the presidency.
Ironically, it was Kennedy who pushed for the change in the law five years ago, fearful that Governor Romney would have been appointing a Republican to the seat if Kerry had won the White House. Now, his legacy is being used to try to change the law so that Kennedy's wife, Vicki, can be appointed to the seat. Democrats apparently hope that another Kennedy would then win the seat in the special election.
Victoria Reggie Kennedy, the widow of Sen. Edward Kennedy who won America’s hearts over the course of her public mourning, is being urged by family and friends to consider her late husband’s Senate seat, even as a field of contenders waits for the right moment to launch their own campaigns.
Vicky had said a couple of weeks ago, when the Kennedy letter that requested the change in the state's succession law was released, that she had no interest in being a senator. Now, the Washington power structure seems to be dancing, on a bipartisan basis, to the tune that a reluctant Vicki is being forced into service. Why, pray tell, would her service be so necessary to the people of Massachusetts?
A Democratic operative with Kennedy contacts told the Herald yesterday Vicki Kennedy is “very much interested” in occupying the seat to see his life’s work completed. A family friend said nephew Joseph P. Kennedy II also is being urged by friends and family to run. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), a close friend of the late senator, publicly urged Vicki Kennedy’s appointment to the post, at least on an interim basis.
Obviously, Vicki's service is of no benefit to Massachusetts voters - it matters to the Obama administration, eager to use the electrical charge that the Funeral infused her with to help propel the U.S. Senate to come together on Universal Health Care. Signals remain confused however.
"Mrs. Kennedy is not interested in the position" of interim senator, Patrick said. The governor would not be specific, however, when asked whether she indicated whether she would run in the special election for her husband's former seat.
Maybe Vicki wants to run for the seat and let another Kennedy take the temporary appointment that doesn't yet exist? After all, Joe Kennedy and Vicki are said to have been doing battle for months over who will get to have the seat permanently. Either way, it's too bad Democrats don't see the people as relevant to the conversation.
The chairmen of the Legislature's Joint Committee on Election Laws announced earlier today they have moved the hearing date from early October to Sept. 9 for a bill that would allow Patrick to appoint an interim senator.
Those devious, dangerous Democrats are at it again - in a race to undo the Constitution before voters realize what they're up to. Their window of opportunity is fast closing, but they're trying to dive through while it's still open a crack.