Superfund President

Imagine you own a business, managed by your daughter as you move toward retirement.

The White House on Thursday dismissed charges that President Obama's top aides have breached his pledge to run the most ethical and open administration in history by trying to entice Democrats in Pennsylvania and Colorado to skip races against favored incumbents.
An important management position opens up, say Chief Financial Officer, and you let your daughter handle the hire on her own. Would you be impressed if she hired the coach of her son's little league team, hoping to win him more playing time, instead of looking for the most qualified CFO in the marketplace? This is how the people's business is done.
A Denver newspaper reported last September that the White House had tried to entice (former House Speaker Andrew) Romanoff with an administration job if he would not challenge (appointed Senator Michael) Bennet, whom Obama openly endorsed. Although the White House denied the report at the time, it really wasn't questioned that Obama wanted Romanoff to stay out of the Senate contest.
Politicians call this "the way things are done," as if, like illegal aliens, the extended period of their ability to get away with the crime legitimizes the bad behavior. But those jobs belong to us - it is power extended by us, paid for with money taken from us. We deserve the best person for the job, not the best person to enhance the power of the elected officials.
But the story resurfaced this month when Rep. Joe Sestak, D-Pa., reported the Obama administration had offered him an unpaid job, if he would clear out of the way and not challenge Sen. Arlen Specter, who had switched to the Democratic Party last year. Specter was facing a hard primary from more conservative Republicans.
You can't call yourself a public servant when you use our money and our power to further a personal power grab instead of using it to further the people's business.
Rich Lowry addresses the Obama argument in the National Journal:
Obama's defenders have fastened on a case where LBJ's White House offered a job to Congressman Joe Kilgore to get him out of a senate primary against Sen. Ralph Yarborough. Fair enough. This shows that this kind of horse-trading has a long pedigree. It's also a sign of what's become of Obama's promises of a new kind of politics that his supporters are running back to LBJ for precedent.
The bar is higher for President Obama, who ran on a marketing plan that included a commitment to improve the scuzzy environment in Washington. Instead, he is turning what was a polluted environment into a Superfund site.