Scott Treatment

They're holding their online noses at the Boston Globe and giving Scott Brown's swearing-in today the respect it is due.

Brown's next stop: Washington

Brown's next stop: Washington
(Gretchen Ertl for The Boston Globe)
The governor certified January's special Senate election today, clearing the way for Senator-elect Scott Brown to be sworn in this evening in Washington.
How do voters feel about Scott being sworn in earlier than expected? Here's some man-on-the-street response from UPI.
Across the country, Republicans are jumping into the ring to challenge Democrats once seen as unbeatable. Could the Kennedy legacy, already severely damaged by Scott's victory, be further undermined in Rhode Island?
John J. Loughlin II, a Republican three-term state representative from Tiverton, has formally launched his bid to unseat the only remaining member of the storied Kennedy clan in national elective office.
Though he has been raising money for months, Loughlin, 50, officially entered the race against U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy, an eight-term Democrat representing the First District, with an announcement Thursday morning outside an office park. With Rhode Island unemployment at 12.9 percent, Loughlin faulted President Obama and the Democrat-controlled Congress for "failed'' job-creation policies, and Kennedy, in particular.
In the Washington Post blog "The Fix," Scott's potential coattails in Massachusetts are explored in coverage of Republican Charlie Baker's run for Governor against incumbent Deval Patrick.
"The biggest lesson [from Brown's victory] is that voters expect to be asked for their vote and they don't expect you to take anything for granted," said Baker in an interview for the Fix's "Rising" series that highlights up and coming politicians.
It was Deval's "Together We Can" campaign in 2006 that David Axelrod used as a dry run for the Obama candidacy.
In just five months of active fundraising in 2009, Baker collected nearly $2.3 million in campaign contributions -- a sum that dwarfed the $1.3 million that Patrick brought in during the entire past year. The beat went on last month with Baker bringing in another $388,000 to just $78,000 for Patrick. (Baker also boasts that he did more than 200 events in the final five months of last year; "we take nothing for granted," he promises.)
Deval's had a tough time raising money - even though the President headlined a fundraiser in Boston last summer - one the Democrats had trouble filling.
Baker's fundraising success led Patrick to do a bit of damage control, sending out a fundraising(!) email that noted: "Insiders may try to use this month's fundraising totals to proclaim that Governor Patrick is in trouble, is unlikely to win in November, or may not even run at all. This is not true."
The odds of Deval surviving Charlie are not very good. If the incumbent has any chance, it is the independent candidacy of Treasurer Tim Cahill - who is hoping to capture the wave of hostility towards incumbents with his retirement last year from the Democratic Party.