Ruby Red

The two political parties are basically equivalent. It's like the Yankees and the Red Sox. While Americans line up emotionally behind one team or the other, their similarities dramatically outweigh their differences. Most everything that Bush was accused of, with great emotional vigor, President Obama is now guilty of. They come from opposing teams, but they share the same playing fields and rule books. We shouldn't be surprised. Root for the Yankees or the Red Sox, but they're still playing Major League Baseball.
As the GOP continues its handwringing over what this moment means for the future of the party, the answer to what the Republican Party should do next is found in the campaign of Barack Obama. The most important discovery that the Obama campaign made, and publicized, about John McCain last year was that he is computer illiterate.
Things have changed in the last 26 years, but McCain hasn't. He admits he still doesn't know how to use a computer, can't send an email, still doesn't understand the economy... After one president who was out of touch, we just can't afford more of the same."
Computer illiteracy on the part of McCain symbolized how far the country had moved beyond it's old man leadership - at  least, as perceived on the American street.
Understanding the magic of the Obama moment requires accepting the role of fashion. Boring, old America held power long enough that it grew complacent, and didn't notice the degree to which it's moment had passed. David Axelrod apparently understood that the country had evolved enough - that the shifting dynamics presented a tipping point. Offer up a youthful, stylish candidate who represented how America sees itself and spontaneous combustion might result.
In his stubborn old way, John McCain was exactly the wrong candidate to run against the inexperienced minority candidate who'd never shown leadership. The desire to be done with the same old same old was so strong that he propelled voters to the new. It didn't matter who the new was. Just as the GOP failed to evolve with the changing times, Democrats, too, have their exposed underbellies. The Dems are the party of bad urban schools and oppressed minorites via their partnership with the teachers unions. They are the party of the destruction of the American auto industry due to their partnership with the labor movement. They are the party of crippled municipal budgets due to their partnership with public employee unions.
Bad schools are no longer fashionable. Holding minorities in permanent bondage with bad education is too destructive. Crippling industry by forcing inflated wages and slow response to fast changing competetive environments with collective bargaining is no longer sustainable. Leaving cities and towns with burdens that can't be carried is not going to be part of a successful America moving forward. These are all products of Democratic policies. As the GOP searches for a direction moving forward, all they have to do is click their heels and get moving. Like Dorothy, they've had the power to get back home all the time.
Obama only symbolized the change that the marketplace was after. The change he's providing is not what America had in mind. Republicans have a chance to offer real change that the nation desperately needs, and while pursuing it, they have a chance to attack the weaknesses of Democrats that have never been capitalized upon. Let's get back to Kansas.