Mal Man

Our president, as malicious and manipulative as politicians come, has no expectation that there will be progress on immigration reform legislation this year.

Rather, he knows that pursuing such legislation would further damage the waning hopes of his party for November.
Even the New York Times, the P.R. company for Obama style radicalism, smelled the rat.
The president’s decision to elevate the issue reflected more of a political strategy than a legislative one since the White House has no plan to actually push a bill this year through a Congress already consumed by other issues. Instead, Mr. Obama’s focus appeared intended to frame the debate for the approaching election to appeal to Hispanic voters who could be critical in several states as well as other middle-class voters turned off by anti-immigrant discourse while blaming Republicans for opposing a comprehensive overhaul.
Despite these realities, the president also needs to mollify the Hispanic community, to whom he promised a vigorous push for reform during his first year in the White House. So, he makes a speech, designed to throw a bone to those who eagerly want amnesty, and to motivate his base.
Playing tricks on his core voters is a lousy option for the president, but, then again, that's what got him into the White House. Think Iraq.