Killer Ted

Dems are still in denial - they continue to think that Ted Kennedy's legacy provides them leverage with voters.
National GOP strategists say that the unexpected tightening in the Massachusetts Senate race has demonstrated the potency of the electorate’s antipathy for the Democratic health care legislation, and that Republican Scott Brown’s campaign could become a template for Republican challengers across the country in this year’s midterm elections.
The Ted Kennedy storyline is nostalgia, not relevant to the political moment that appears ready to sweep an unknown Republican state senator into the seat held for 47 years by Jack Kennedy's kid brother.
It's not Ted Kennedy's seat - it's not even his politcal era. Time has moved on, and those story lines are no longer relevant. The health care story belongs to Scott Brown now - the man who promises that he'll be the 41st vote against it if he is chosen to succeed Teddy.
“He’s making health care a front-and-center issue in the most liberal state in the country, and it’s working for him,’’ said Whit Ayres, who cofounded Resurgent Republic, a group of conservative pollsters and strategists formed to shape the national debate. “That’s the major message - that this bill is an albatross around the necks of the Democrats, and if it works this well in Massachusetts, just imagine how well it will work in less liberal states.’’
But the funny thing about Teddy is that he is the reason that we didn't get a universal health care plan thirty-five years ago. They want to link his death to some sort of emotional imperative regarding reform, but Ted Kennedy is actually the man who killed America health care reform.
It's true - just a few years before Teddy ushered in the Reagan era by leading a liberal revolt against Jimmy Carter, he worked with unions to stop health care from being passed. The Ted Kennedy story is a phony one, like most of the arguments you hear from the socialists.