D equals Liberal

It hasn't been hard for the Democrats thusfar in their latest attempt to dismantle America, it's just been slow. Now that they've decided to move ahead and consider the health reform legislation in the senate, the tough part begins.
Sen. Blanche Lincoln said she will vote in favor of starting debate on health reform legislation. But she warned that she does not support the government-run public option currently in the bill and threatened to withhold her vote in order to influence the coming debate.
What happens now is a race against public opinion. Support for the president is falling, support for reform is falling, and after January 1, we're in an election year. Holding together the fragile coalitions of scared Democrats will be much harder in an election year.
“Although I don’t agree with everything in this bill, I have concluded that I believe it is more important that we begin this debate to improve our nation’s health care system for all Americans rather than just simply drop the issue and walk away. It is not what people sent us here to do,” Lincoln said. “I will not vote in favor of the proposal that has been introduced by Leader Reid as it is written.”
Not only that, but they'll have to come up with one bill that satisfies the needs of the two branches of Congress rather than one bill for each chamber. That fight will further erode public confidence in the Democrats, and further reveal that Democrats are a fringe group. Consider David Broder's analysis of the recent Quinnipiac Poll.
This poll may not be as famous as some others, but I know the care and professionalism of the people who run it, and one question was particularly interesting to me. It read: "President Obama has pledged that health insurance reform will not add to our federal budget deficit over the next decade. Do you think that President Obama will be able to keep his promise or do you think that any health care plan that Congress passes and President Obama signs will add to the federal budget deficit?"
This question reveals the hazard for the liberals (ie Democrats). Victory will destroy the future of the party.
The answer: Less than one-fifth of the voters -- 19 percent of the sample -- think he will keep his word. Nine of 10 Republicans and eight of 10 independents said that whatever passes will add to the torrent of red ink. By a margin of four to three, even Democrats agreed this is likely.
80% of independents, the center of the country, know that Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi, and Harry Reid are lying to them. The center of the country now knows that it erred in turning power over to Democrats. Even Democrats don't expect their party to be responsible in a time of fiscal crisis.
That fear contributed directly to the fact that, by a 16-point margin, the majority in this poll said they oppose the legislation moving through Congress.
Why are the Democrats pursuing a massive structural change that the country can't afford at a time of fiscal crisis rather than meeting the demand to turn their sites on the economy?
While the CBO said that both the House-passed bill and the one Reid has drafted meet Obama's test by being budget-neutral, every expert I have talked to says that the public has it right. These bills, as they stand, are budget-busters. Here, for example, is what Robert Bixby, the executive director of the Concord Coalition, a bipartisan group of budget watchdogs, told me: "The Senate bill is better than the House version, but there's not much reform in this bill. As of now, it's basically a big entitlement expansion, plus tax increases."
Because the Democratic Party has become a fringe party of radical lefties on the one hand, and on the other, it is making a play for a massive realignment of the country to assure themselves of political viability in the future.
Here's another expert, Maya MacGuineas, the president of the bipartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget: "While this bill does a better job than the House version at reducing the deficit and controlling costs, it still doesn't do enough. Given the political system's aversion to tax increases and spending cuts, I worry about what the final bill will look like."
Remember that White America doesn't give the majority of it's votes to Democrats in national elections. Not due to racial issues, but because White America is traditional America, and traditional Americans know that Democrats don't believe in the premise of this nation.
If you read deep enough, you will find that under the Senate bill, "federal outlays for health care would increase during the 2010-2019 period" -- not decline. The gross increase would be almost $1 trillion -- $848 billion, to be exact, mainly to subsidize the uninsured. The net increase would be $160 billion.
To compensate for its lack of popularity with traditional America, the Dems look to expand their base. The base of the party is the dependent class whom they bribe with social programs or public employee unions, who they bribe with inappropriate salaries and benefits.
The health care bill works for Dems because it takes 17% of the economy and puts it in their control. Long range projection? Millions more public workers who the Dems can bribe with unaffordable pay and benefits.
The challenge to Congress -- and to Obama -- remains the same: Make the promised savings real, and don't pass along unfunded programs to our children and grandchildren.
The problem for the Democrats with health care is three-fold: First, Americans are learning, finally, that this is not Jack Kennedy's party - for the first time, voters are coming to understand that Democrat equals Liberal.
Publisher HarperCollins said Friday that Sarah Palin's memoir sold 300,000 copies its first day, among the best openings ever for a nonfiction book. "Going Rogue" was released this week and its print run already has been increased from 1.5 million copies to 2.5 million.
Second, the health care plan may get passed, but it's not going to be implemented for years. In the meantime, the new taxes go into effect, and an anxious America is wondering where's the benefit of the massive health care reform.
Among self-identified Republicans in the survey, Palin gets the highest favorable ratings (70 percent) amid a group of other possible contenders for the GOP nomination, including Mike Huckabee (63 percent), Mitt Romney (60 percent) and Newt Gingrich (58 percent). Palin's favorable score among all voters is 47 percent, up nine percentage points over last July's reading of 38 percent.
Third - as long term rising unemployment bumps into the midterm elections, Americans will get more aggravated over the fact that the Obama Administration focused on health care rather than jobs.
President Obama recently stated that he "probably won't" read Sarah Palin's new book. But his possible opponent in the 2012 elections trails him in personal favorability by only seven points (54 percent to 47 percent). Among the critical segment of independent voters, they are virtually even (Obama at 50 percent; Palin at 49 percent).
Democrats will come to be loathed, their majorities will evaporate, and dangerous portions of the new socialism will hopefully be dismantled.
Despite being characterized by many as a divisive force in her party and the nation, former vice-presidential contender Sarah Palin gets a much higher positive rating than Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi -- and most think Palin has been treated unfairly by the press.
Democrats are forcing through health reform because, based on the political damage suffered after Clinton failed in its attempts, they think passing it will be better for them than failure. In this, they are surely wrong.