By 2012

The story is that Harry Reid decided to push immigration reform ahead of climate change legislation as a way to try to drum up support for his reelection bid among Hispanics in Nevada. That sent Republican Lindsey Graham into a tizzy, irate that after months of working on the climate bill, Reid was going to play politics with immigration.

Escalating his criticism and adopting rhetoric used by many conservative lawmakers, Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) said there is no hope of passing a comprehensive bill this year and warned that forcing the issue would be "absolutely devastating" to chances for future passage.
Graham was so upset that he withdrew his support for the energy legislation yesterday.
Graham said Saturday that Democrats were focusing on immigration because of a "cynical political" calculation, and he said he will no longer support comprehensive energy and climate legislation -- another key issue in which he was negotiating with Democrats -- unless they relent on immigration.
Reid is desperate to improve his reelection chances.
In a hypothetical general election match-up, 47 percent of respondents said they'd vote for GOP Chair Sue Lowden if the November election were held today, while 37 percent said they would reelect Reid to a fifth term as the Silver State's senor senator. Reid was first elected to the Senate in 1986.
Either way, Democrats like solidifying their bond with Hispanic voters by talking about, or failing at passing, immigration reform. At the same time, such talk improves prospects for the GOP in November, increasing the feeling that there is a rogue regime in charge of Washington.